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THE ULTIMATE AIRSOFT GUIDE – GET STARTED IN AIRSOFT THE RIGHT WAY!

Getting started in airsoft can be confusing, there’s a lot of technical jargon, complex terms and phrases that people throw around and things can move so fast it can be hard to get a chance to ask the most basic questions. Fear not though, you don’t have to be too embarrassed to ask. Over the next 6 issues we will be pushing you through the “ULTIMATE AIRSOFT GUIDE”. When you come out the other end, you’ll know everything you need to know!



Welcome to the biggest and most comprehensive Airsoft Guide in the world! If you’re here, we’re guessing it’s because you want to find out more about airsoft. You have probably watched a dozen YouTube videos, maybe you have spent hours on airsoft forums or you have been nagging your airsoft friends for the past few weeks. Either way, you’re ready to pull the trigger and jump into this exciting new hobby that you can’t stop obsessing about. You are finally ready to buy your first airsoft gun and gear up!

Does this sound anything like you? It’s exactly how most people felt when they first discovered the wonderful and exciting world of airsoft. You can actually play Call Of Duty or Battlefield in real life? Are you joking? Where do I sign up?!
Unless you want to repeat the same mistakes we made and spend way too much money on bad airsoft gear, you need to read every word on this comprehensive guide. In an effort to save you a lot of time and money we have compiled everything you need to know about airsoft over the next 6 months.

If you’re reading this the chances are that there are many crucial things you don’t know about this awesome sport but don’t worry, we can fix that. We will make your life easier and show you every golden nugget and share every piece of advice we have been given over many combined years of airsoft experience. We will be comprehensive where required but we will go into the technical details when it is needed; Airsoft is after all a technical game and some complexities can’t be avoided. To make it easier to grasp we will use basic language and simple terms instead of the jargon you might find elsewhere.
In this comprehensive airsoft guide we will be taking a detailed look at the fundamental topics of airsoft. Want to know why your gun isn’t Li-PO ready? Read this article. Want to learn about HPA systems? Read this article. Armed with expert knowledge and experience and utilising sound recommendations, you will be ready to make the best, educated, decision on what gear you need, what gun you are interested in and how you want to approach this awesome game. Don’t rely on a whim or what is currently trendy. Read this article and you’ll know exactly what to buy and why.

The very beginnings, the history of airsoft.

 

The general consensus is that the sport came about sometime during the 1980s in Japan. Fuelled by the desire to imitate their favourite action heroes and limited by their strict gun ownership laws, Japanese gun enthusiasts set out to create the first replica guns – DIY airsoft handguns.
The Japanese hobbyists were limited in expertise and material. These first prototypes have very little in common with modern airsoft guns, nevertheless, the craze about airsoft quickly spread throughout Japan as well as the whole of Asia. As demand for better airsoft replicas grew, so did production.

Big players such as Tokyo Marui, KWC and Classic Army were born and started manufacturing high-quality airsoft guns and rifles. At first these guns were spring powered, then air powered, many needing to be pre-charged using a bicycle pump and then the first Automatic Electric Gun came along form Tokyo Marui in the form of the battery-powered FA-MAS. Although the centre of the airsoft world still remains in Asia, soon airsoft guns were being made and sold in Europe and North America too.

Over the last few decades, airsoft guns have evolved tremendously, bearing little resemblance to those of the early 1980s. With the introduction of commercially available gas and electric powered guns also came snipers, rifles, SMGs and even grenades as well as a wide array of different accessories, gun add-ons and upgrades.

Today airsoft has become an extremely popular sport played all around the globe. We have our own leagues, associations and thousands of teams in all countries of the world! Things have moved on in a massive way and we can only guess what the future might hold

The Technology – Spring, Gas, Electric and HPA

When we talk airsoft, we specify guns according to their firing mechanism. In that respect, we can classify airsoft guns in a several main categories. 

Spring powered, Gas powered, Battery powered and High Pressure Air powered (HPA)

We also categorise guns by their specific purpose on the battlefield; rifles, smg’s, pistols, snipers, shotguns. We will be covering gun classes later, for now, let’s get a firm understanding of the basics.

Spring Powered Airsoft Guns

Ah, the springer. Most seasoned vets have owned at least one spring gun during their airsoft lifetime. Spring powered airsoft guns use powerful springs to drive a piston, compress air and eventually propel their ammunition down range. Springers are the simplest type of airsoft gun and are often the cheapest, least powerful but some also have the capability to be turned into fearsomely powerful sniper rifles.
To shoot, you cock your gun, pulling the piston into the spring guide and against the spring, and squeeze the trigger which releases the compressed spring and sends your BB flying.
Their design make spring powered airsoft guns incapable of being fired semi-automatically or automatically. You have to cock your gun for every single shot. Every. Single. Shot.
Because of this, 90% of spring guns are either pistols, snipers rifles or shotguns. Manually powering an “assault rifle” simply isn’t efficient.

In comparison with gas powered pistols, spring powered pistols generally aren’t as powerful.
Spring powered pistols are almost always the cheapest airsoft pistols as they are usually of lower quality which in turn makes them prone to wear and tear. Because of their straightforward mechanics, springers are also extremely light-weight. So light, in fact, that some manufacturers install weights to give a more appropriate feel to the gun. Most cheap spring guns are difficult to repair or upgrade due to a lack of standard manufacturing practices among airsoft gun manufacturers. You’ll be hard pressed to find spare or upgrade plastic parts for your springer.

Poor weather conditions is where spring powered airsoft guns really have their only advantages. While gas models are adversely affected by cold weather conditions, spring powered guns are barely affected. You won’t have to worry about a gas-leaking magazine or underperforming electricals due to cold or wet conditions. You will never have to worry about rain or snow, something that can’t be said about electric or gas powered airsoft guns.

Spring powered guns also don’t rely on any external source of power (not counting your hands). Except for a new spring from time to time, you will never have to shell out money for expensive gas or finicky batteries.
Their low prices and reliability make spring powered pistols useful for beginners and general target practice. I could never recommend spring rifles or pistols for skirmish purposes as their clumsiness, low rate of fire (ROF), weak performance and short range make them about as useful as throwing sesame seeds at your opponents. When it comes to sniper rifles and shotguns though, things look very different.

There are a few disadvantages of spring powered airsoft snipers. For one, it becomes taxing to manually operate the bolt for every shot. This may become a problem with upgraded sniper rifles that achieve 500+ FPS as you’ll be pulling back very powerful, heavy springs which takes some effort.

Another problem with highly customised, powerful airsoft sniper rifles is that the forces involved in getting the gun to fire at the desired power level can mean a lot of upgrading. Nearly every part inside the gun will require replacing with an uprated, stronger component making what was a cheap and cheerful gun into a much more expensive outlay.
With that said springers are a very strong contender if your main role is a sniper. Their comparatively low costs, light weight, versatility in different weather condition and reliability make spring powered bolt-action snipers a solid choice for anyone keen on spotting their opponents through a scope!


Gas Powered Airsoft Guns

Gas powered airsoft guns use compressed gas to fire out BBs out of your gun. In contrast to springers, gas powered guns are capable of firing semi-automatically through a blowback feature. No more cocking your gun for every shot. This makes gas powered guns operate similarly to regular firearms. Blowback guns also sound amazing! The most commonplace gas guns are pistols and many users rely on a gas pistol as a sidearm but full rifles and SMGs are also available and are arguably even more fun.

Gas powered guns most commonly use “Green Gas” , a mixture of propane and silicon oil, or some other type of gas, such as 1,1,1,2-Tetrafluoroethane (try saying that 3 times in a row) or rarely Difluoromonochloromethane, also known as “Red Gas”.

Plain old CO2 is probably the second most popular propellant for airsoft gas weapons. We’ll get more into this on our gas section of this airsoft guide.

Gas powered airsoft guns are fun. A lot of fun. Gas powered guns can become problematic and finicky if you don’t take care of them and sometimes even then they can be fussy. Gas guns are more heavily affected by weather conditions, with power loss directly correlated with the outside temperature. Green gas is stored in a compressed liquid form and it is the expansion from liquid to gas that creates the “explosive” propulsion force through the gun. In lower temperatures this expansion is less effective and less violent, meaning less fun for you and your gun.
When you use a gas gun rapidly, the continued release of gas actually has a cooling effect on the gun and indeed the gas inside the gun, meaning that the temperature will eventually lower enough to influence the expansion of the remaining gas. This can lead to frozen seals and o-rings that will temporarily disable you gun or gas magazine until it all warms up enough. Because of this, it’s not advisable to try and use gas guns in very low temperatures purely because of the time it will take for the whole thing to warm up to an operable temperature.
Buying gas can be expensive. Sooner or later magazines start to leak and you’ll be going through O-rings like crazy, always buy extra. They are also some of the most powerful guns out there. Their semi-automatic and (sometimes) automatic rate of fire make them as useful as they are fun.
If your goal is to have to squeeze the most amount of fun out of this hobby, we can wholeheartedly recommend that you buy at least one GBB (Gas Blow Back) gun, just don’t rely on being able to use it all year round if you live anywhere where winter requires a pair of gloves and a scarf!

Electric Airsoft Guns

Electric airsoft guns or AEGs came along and revolutionised airsoft, the first was the previously mentioned Tokyo Marui FA-MAS. Since then, AEGs have become the most popular and reliable airsoft guns with countless designs and replicas on the market. Most airsoft players have at least one in their armoury, if not many more. Most AEGs are full-zed rifles or SMGs but some miniaturised systems are available and they are put into pistols.

Like most things in Airsoft, the principles behind electric airsoft guns are rather simple.
Your regular electric gun has a setup of gears, which are powered by the motor inside your gun. Those gears then “pull” the piston assembly against the spring and when the trigger is squeezed, said assembly is released which in turn propels your bb out of your gun muzzle.
Electric guns are nothing more than a springer with an electric motor that cocks the gun for you.
In other words, what you do with your hands on a springer, the electric gun does on its own using the motor. Simple, right?

Electric powered airsoft guns are by far the most common on the airsoft field. Their advantages are hard to compete against. Due to the use of an electric motor, which operates the spring, both automatic and semi-automatic fire can be achieved. This is also the reason why people commonly call this type of gun AEG’s – Automatic Electric Guns.

All electric powered airsoft guns are powered by batteries, rechargeable batteries in most cases and this is a large subject that we will cover as a standalone in a future issue. In contrast to gas guns, where their power output may deteriorate as the gas in the magazine is used up, battery powered guns do not suffer from this issue. As the charge in the battery goes down, your rate of fire may take a hit – but your gun will shoot with the same power every shot until the battery is flat.

When compared to gas airsoft guns, AEGs are much more stable in respect to influence from the ambient temperature. In colder conditions where GBBs simply stop working, your AEG will be just fine. Apart from the hop-up bucking stiffening up, a shortcoming that all airsoft guns share, AEGs will be just fine in high and low temperatures.

For most of us, AEGs are our favourite class of guns, and with good reason. Some of the biggest names in Airsoft manufacturing produce AEGs, they are reliable, fast and pack as much power as you would ever need in competitive combat.

High Pressure Air Airsoft Guns

With AEGs taking the majority of the market, a recent resurgence in the use of HPA has arisen. HPA guns dominated the market prior t the advent of the AEG but with all things being cyclical, HPA has cropped up again.
Instead of using green gas or an electrically powered spring, HPA systems rely on the mechanism of pneumatics;  High Pressure Air, to propel BBs. HPA guns are connected via a hose, through a regulator, to a tank of compressed air, which you’ll be carrying around at all times.Yes, you physically carry a tank of compressed air with you.
The compressed air travels through the regulator and the hose into the gun’s “engine”, usually powered by a small battery.

Some newer models, such as the Valken AR1, sport a self-contained system. This means no cord, as the air tank is hidden within your rifle stock. Useful for sure, but the gun’s aesthetics take a hit. Hiding a bulky air tank without compromising the original look of an airsoft firearm is not very easy. This is the major disadvantage to HPA systems along with the fact that you will need to get tanks filled at a specialist centre, a service offered by diving schools or stores most commonly and this can be troublesome in itself, certainly less convenient than using green gas.

Conventional HPA air tanks are pressurised at 300-800 psi. Some tanks are designed to handle less pressure, which increases the longevity of the regulator and all the internals of your HPA system. Regulators downgrade the air tank’s psi to 200 psi and less.

You control your regulator and how much it regulates your air pressure. More pressure means more power. Pretty straight-forward.

HPA systems performs much better in cold climates in comparison to GBBs. They are also much quieter, a huge advantage in competitive play. Except for your generic O-ring maintenance, HPA guns don’t need much attention. Once set up, it’s a simple system, you won’t be spending hours maintaining its performance.

Adjustability is another humongous plus, the ability to change your gun’s power and rate of fire is considered so overpowered, that some cynics have labeled HPA users as “cheaters”.
Usually airsoft fields will have strict rules about this. Your settings will have to be approved before play, so as to avoid overly powerful, “hot” guns. Additionally, the trigger feedback mimics that of a real life firearm, recovering some realism points.

 

This ultimate airsoft guide has been serialised and adapted for publication in AIrsoft International and was originally written for AirsoftPal.com. It is reproduced here with full permission from it’s author. The next instalments can be found in Airsoft International Volume 12 Issue 11 onwards.

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LCT M70 AB2 – AEG REVIEW

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LCT have done a fine job of producing a line of detailed and specific AK-based models to rival that of the huge number of AR-based derivatives many manufacturers choose to produce. This month we have another authentic, beautifully made and interesting Kalashnikov variant on test…

I’ve often said that AKs are some of the most misidentified weapons in the firearms world. Not in terms of the newspapers just calling everything an “AK47” but deeper than that. Even many firearms enthusiasts tend to misidentify AK variants with frequency. Somebody at LCT must have a real passion for the subject though, because they produce a great number of subtly different variants all with details and variations carefully considered. Although the silhouettes of the guns might remain largely familiar, when you take a closer look you have some very interesting guns.

M70 AB2

The M70 AB2 is produced by Zastava, often acclaimed as the finest manufacturer of AK-type rifles in the world. The M70 was built to outfit the then Yugoslavian (now Serbian) armed forces in 1970. It borrows heavily from the AK design but features some interesting details. We were drawn to the replica after seeing recent images of the British Police in counter-terrorism training and noticing that the weapons they were using to discharge what we assume were blanks were more interesting than your average AKM or AK74.

The M70 AB2 is the result of several revisions and cost-efficiency exercises and the end result differs from it’s forerunners based on this. Like most modern AK-based rifles, the M70 AB2 uses a stamped receiver and pinned barrel as opposed to a heavier, milled barrel and threaded barrel system. Although the latter prove to be more robust, the additional cost and weight is often deemed unnecessary when it comes to the longevity of the finished piece. Essentially a stamped and pinned weapon works and lasts more than well enough in comparison to how much it costs to produce.

The AB2 model (the A in the nomenclature indicating the presence of an underflowing stock as opposed to a full, wooden fixed stock) eventually would comprise of a thickened 1.5mm stamped receiver and bulged barrel trunnion to give the rifle the strength and robustness to deal with the stresses of the rifle grenade launcher attachment.

The “real deal” M70 AB2 features a safe, burst, semi fire selector system and can be visually distinguished from the AKM through several factors. As well as the thicker stamped receiver, the light beech wood furniture features three cooling slots on the hand grip as well as the integrated rifle grenade sight and gas cut-off on the gas block. The barrel of the real thing is also non-chrome lined, making the weapon more accurate than the AKM but more susceptible to corrosion. As visible on the LCT replica, there’s also a different polymer pistol grip fitted to the M70 when compared to that of the AKM and others in the family.

LCT’s M70 AB2

With a little insight into the context of the M70 AB2, let’s take a look at the replica itself. Visually, we are dealing with an accurate and faithful rendition of the M70. Primarily the steel metalwork of the receiver and barrel, along with the associated parts is bang up to scratch and well on par with the rest of LCT’s offerings. That is to say they are amongst some of the most realistic on the marketplace.

The receiver, although not quite the 1.5mm thick of the real thing is a good 1mm sheet thickness and formed into a fantastic replica of the stamped receiver of the M70. As with many AEGs, the dimensions are slightly off when compared side by side to the real thing, but scarcely enough to be of note.

The receiver is modelled with various pin positions, indents and even the bulged trunnion design of the M70 and faithfully it bears the U (safe), R (burst) and J (semi) marking on the fire selector; a detail that would be easy to overlook when producing a replica weapon. Along the barrel we have the specific M70 AB2 gas block featuring the pressed sheet metal grenade sighting system and also the front sight. The front sight post incorporates a flip up piece that obscures the front sight post when engaged in position and would provide phosphorescent or tritium illuminated low light sighting. This is again a small and easily overlooked addition to the M70 and it’s something that’s exciting to see featuring on the replica. Unfortunately the the front sight system doesn’t have any sort of illumination in place but features an indent to allow you to paint your own marker dot in place. This isn’t a difficult job to accomplish at all.

The lengthened, smooth beechwood hand guards match the reference images we have seen perfectly, even though they look a little clean and clinical on first glance and the polymer pistol grip is a larger Zastava-style design that improves upon the original AKM and AK designs in our opinion. It actually looks similar to some of the more modern Zenitco offerings but with a bit of retro flair.

All round the externals of the M70 AB2 from LCT are robustly and faithfully reproduced in fitting with the real weapon. Even the mock bolt cover is enhanced with a more substantial design and although it doesn’t reciprocate with the action of the gun firing, it’s heavy and chunky enough to make a satisfying and metallic “clunk” when operated by hand, which must be done to access the hop unit.

Overall the only part of the LCT M70 AB2 that we can’t find in keeping with the real gun is the rear sight ramp, which seems to be a generic AK item and not the night-sight equipped M70 spec component. This could quite easily be replaced if you can source something more accurate to the real thing though.

Inside the Gun

With a  massive range of replicas based on the humble Version 3 AEG gearbox, it would suit LCT well to ensure they had a decent off the shelf option to fit them all with. Fortunately, they have that bit sorted out and squared away.

LCT’s all metal, high spec gearbox system comprises of a quality metal casing that has enough quality to hold its own as an aftermarket part. Inside this casing you get solid steel gears working on large ball bearings which are surprising smooth and well shimmed. In terms of strength, they work fine with the stock spring, producing around 1.2joules but they can also withstand an upgrade spring and still run absolutely fine.

In terms of additional components, you get LCT’s awesome looking, shiny heat-dispersing ribbed cylinder on show along with a good smattering of quality plastic components inside the gearbox, like the switch and associated parts. Without labouring the points we have made in reference to the LCT gearbox in the current crop of guns (because we have spoken about them at length in previous reviews) we will leave it at saying that what you get is a very high quality and capable power plat for your gun that will serve you well in its basic guise or will alternatively act as a solid foundation for future upgrades. In fact our good friend Mick Johnson, creator of some of the most brutal, high speed AK builds we have ever seen, relies on the LCT parts for 90% of his work, only upgrading beyond the stock components in a few cases.

One thing that is great to see in the LCT gun is a quality polymer hop unit. You don’t gain anything by rough casting a metal hop unit except for poor finishing and slightly distorted sizes. Polymer does a fantastic job for airsoft gun hop units and only in some very expensive, precision CNC’d cases do we thing ant other material does a better job. LCT’s simple black V3 AK hop unit fits into the M70 and mates to a brass barrel. Although the stock brass barrels perform well enough, there will certainly be scope to improve this, along with the hop rubbers, with your choice of components. Compatibility with aftermarket parts is broad so the world is your oyster in this sense.

Performance

Despite being well built in all respects, the M70 AB2 is essentially a generic Version 3 AEG which will bestow a good level of longevity and reliability upon its performance however what you get hardly gives you “cutting edge” features. It’s just a basic AEG inside really.

A few years ago it would have been impossible to complain about this but as airsoft technology has progressed the level of expectation has gradually risen and what used to be considered exotic features are now pretty much expected. At least with the LCT set-up you get a dependable platform on which to build into. One thing that we would consider implementing would be some kind of trigger control system, maybe an ASCU, in order to add the “burst” function of the real M70 AB2 instead of having simple full auto or semi auto. Thanks to LCT’s standardised design, this is a very “by the numbers” upgrade process though.

Potential aside, what LCT’s M70 gives you is a solid, dependable shooter that puts out rounds at around 330fps which makes it about spot on for most UK sites. The potential to drop in a bigger spring to peak out performance is there and the components will handle this. Battery dependant, you will be looking at between 13 and 15 rounds per second on full auto. If you want to push things with an 11.1v LiPo pack, you will juice out more.

In terms of range and accuracy, the stock hop rubber and barrel combination does a solid job with lighter ammo. If you want to maximise range you might find yourself needing to upgrade the hop rubbers to something with a little more “grip” on the BB to get a more consistent backspin/hop effect.

One aspect that is nearly impossible to ignore though is the great value for money you get with LCT. A faithful and accurate replica built from steel and wood combined with a solid gearbox and internal component selection all for just £270? You really don’t get much better value than that throughout the world of AEGs and for that reason alone, LCT go right to the top of my shopping list when it comes to guns of this type!

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Vital Stats 

Price: £270 (Fire Support)
Weight: 3.6kg

Length: 650-890mm

Hop up: Adjustable

Magazine capacity: 600rnds Hi-Cap

Velocity: Up to 330fps (1.2-1.3 Joules)

Pros:

Built like a brick outhouse
Many authentic details
Solid internals to match

Cons:

Basic, simple AEG tech
Rear sight not “authentic” for the M70
Missing burst mode

First published in Airsoft International Volume 12 Issue 2

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HR4K TRAINING PLATES


When you think of training and getting fit in general, one of the last things you’d think about was loading up your plate but we are talking about a different kind of loading up and indeed a different kind of plate altogether! HR4K.co.uk, the outfit we acquired our recently reviewed Platatac dump pouch through, has another string to their bow and have set their sights on more than just tactical nylon.

 

Not so long ago in Airsoft International, we ran a short series of features about health and fitness and the impact that it can have on your enjoyment of airsoft. Sure, the idea of running, lifting weights and suffering isn’t for everyone and of course, airsoft is accessible for everyone no matter their level of fitness. One thing is for certain though, with even a little physical conditioning you’ll find skirmishing a lot more comfortable and less strenuous, alternatively you’ll be able to push harder and fight longer than ever before… Forget upgrading your gun when you can upgrade yourself!

 Many airsofters also like to make a commitment to realism and all that real-deal gear can get tough to lug around for just the one or two days a month we might manage to get to a skirmish; it can easily get to the point where it’s actually physically risky to except yourself that hard without some kind of prior preparation. At it’s most basic, a little work on training and fitness is pretty beneficial to the physically demanding activity that airsoft can be whether you like it or not.

LOADED PLATE!

Body armour is one of the parts of an authentic airsoft load out that we as airsofters most commonly cheat our way around… Sure, we wear plate carriers but often we do our best to fill them out with something as lightweight and comfortable as possible. Unfortunately armour that stops bullets is far from lightweight so if you really want that taste and appreciation for what it is really like to be fighting in a combat situation, you are going to have to get used to carrying anything between 10-12kg of extra weight right next to your body. This isn’t to mention the weight of additional ammunition and magazines which works out at around half a kilogram per fully loaded magazine… Suddenly carrying 10 magazines doesn’t sound so attractive does it, although those GBBR users out there will likely know the pain well.

Whether you want the plates to help you achieve your fitness goals or you want a taste of realism without having to source genuine ballistic plates, which can cost over £200 a piece if not more, HR4K.co.uk’s weighted plate system gives you a realistic filler system and a realistic, well-balanced weight to use your carrier as part of your training. From squats, push-ups, running or other popular cross-fit activities, a weighted vest will increase the intensity of your workout and before long you will be acclimatised to physical activity with the extra weight.

PLATE FEATURES

HR4K’s plate system comes with two dual curve ESAPI (medium) sized steel plates that are hand cut and formed in the UK from UK-sourced steel, then Cerakoted for durability. They then have HR4k graphic transfers applied on one side and a 10mm neoprene foam backing adhered to the other for comfort and also a realistic armour plate thickness. Each plate weights 5kg, simulating a fully protective armour system and can be worn by both males and females.

In addition to the two plates the kit includes 3 STANAG-sized 500g weights, cerakoted and neoprene backed just like the rest. These are made to fit in magazine pouches to simulate the weight of fully loaded 30rnd magazines and have holes drilled for the attachment of dummy cords for easy extraction. As fractional weights, these are useful for maxing out of repetitions and pushing yourself to the limit during workouts so we’d probably like to see more of them included in the kit, or available separately, or potentially double thickness, double weight versions at 1kg a piece.

The plate kits cost £192 direct from HR4K.co.uk which seems quite a lot for inert, dummy plates is still less than comparable weight ballistic armour, which is also notoriously tough to get hold of due to restrictions.

About HR4K



The Hereford Kit Company, or HR4K for short, are a new and recently formed business based out of Hereford, UK in an unsurprising and not so cryptic twist! Given the geographic location it doesn’t take a genius to work out who the owners talk to and deal with on a regular basis but that’s all we will say on that matter, less some guys with rectangular sunglasses come and visit our houses in the middle of the night!

 HR4K are, as is fitting, about more than just tactical nylon, pouches and the associated items and the small but perfectly formed selection of brands they are curating are a reflection of this. Their own HR4K branded gear as detailed here is a new addition but other brands have also been carefully selected for their relevance and quality.

 

 

BEAVERFIT

BEAVERFIT IS AN INTERNATIONAL INSTITUTION OF TRAINING EQUIPMENT. ORIGINAL IN DESIGN AND MANUFACTURE, PROVIDING BESPOKE FUNCTIONAL FITNESS SOLUTIONS AND CERTIFICATED TRAINING TO THE MILITARY, UNIFORMED SERVICES, PROFESSIONAL SPORTS CLUBS, EDUCATIONAL ESTABLISHMENTS, HEALTH CLUBS AND MORE, GLOBALLY.

BEAVERFIT WAS STARTED BY TOM BEAVER AND GREW OUT OF A PERSONAL PASSION FOR THE TOUGHEST ENDURANCE BASED FITNESS TRAINING. INCORPORATED IN 2010 OUT OF A CHALLENGE BY THE BRITISH MILITARY, BEAVERFIT HAS GONE ON TO BE A WORLD LEADER IN THE PRODUCTION OF TRAINING EQUIPMENT.

PLATATAC

OFFERING A DIVERSE RANGE OF SPECIALIST PRODUCTS AND EQUIPMENT, PLATYPUS OUTDOORS GROUP IS AS UNIQUE AS THE ANIMAL WE DERIVE OUR NAME FROM. FROM HUMBLE BEGINNINGS WITH AN AMBITIOUS VISION, WE HAVE GROWN FROM A SIMPLE OUTDOORS AND MILITARIA STORE TO AN INTERNATIONAL DISTRIBUTOR OF OVER 40 WORLDWIDE BRAND NAMES WITH A COMBINED PRODUCT LIST IN THE THOUSANDS. WE OFFER A GREAT RANGE OF PRODUCTS AND CAPABILITIES IN SUPPORT OF THE SOLDIERS AND LAW ENFORCEMENT PERSONNEL THAT STAND ON THE BATTLEMENTS LOOKING OVER US WHILST WE ARE SAFE IN OUR HOMES. THANKS TO YOU GUYS; WE SIMPLY WOULD NOT EXIST WITHOUT YOUR SUPPORT.

ROGUE AMERICAN

ROGUE AMERICAN WAS FOUNDED IN AUGUST 2011 BY A MARINE, WHO ALSO SERVED AS A HIGH THREAT SECURITY PROFESSIONAL AND EXECUTIVE PROTECTION SPECIALIST, IN PLACES LIKE YEMEN, IRAQ, AFGHANISTAN, EUROPE AND THE UNITED STATES. PROUDLY SERVING WITH AMERICA’S FINEST INDIVIDUALS WHO LIVE BY THE WARRIOR ETHOS OF COURAGE AND COMMITMENT INSPIRED ME TO CREATE A BRAND THAT KEPT WITHIN THE HIGH STANDARDS OF THOSE WHO LIVE THIS WARRIOR MINDSET.

C2RFAST



C2RFAST IS COMMITTED TO DESIGNING AND MAKING HIGH END EQUIPMENT FOR OUR CHOSEN NICHE MARKETS. USING ONLY THE BEST QUALITY MATERIALS AND TECHNIQUES, OUR PRODUCTS ARE ROBUST AND STRONG. WE LOOK TO USE APPROPRIATE TECHNOLOGY BECAUSE WE UNDERSTAND HOW OUR PRODUCTS ARE GOING TO BE USED, AND WHAT CHALLENGES OUR CUSTOMERS FACE EVERYDAY – SO USABILITY AND RELIABILITY ARE KEY. WE STRIVE FOR BETTER THINGS.

HARDCORE HARDWARE AUSTRALIA

HARDCORE HARDWARE AUSTRALIA UTILISES THE LATEST IN MODERN SOFTWARE, MATERIALS AND CONSTRUCTION TECHNIQUES TO BUILD SOME OF THE MOST HARDCORE TOOLS ON THE PLANET. WE DO THIS TO AID YOU IN THE PERFORMANCE OF YOUR DUTIES. WE WOULD LIKE TO THANK THOSE BRAVE MEN AND WOMEN OF THE AUSTRALIAN & NEW ZEALAND DEFENCE FORCES TOGETHER WITH THEIR COALITION PARTNERS FOR ENSURING THE PRESERVATION OF OUR FREEDOM. WE ARE PROUD TO SUPPORT YOU.

This feature was first printed in Airsoft International Magazine Volume 12, Issue 5.